A Brief History of Medical Cannabis and Cannabinoids in the U.S.

The Ayurvedic Medicine Materia Medica Since the late 1940s and early 1950s, both state and federal entities have assiduously avoided treating cannabis as the medicine it has been for over 4,000 years. Cannabis has been recognized as a medicine since at least 2637 B.C.E. when it was included in the first known pharmacopoeia, the Ping Ts’ao Ching, alleged to be written by the second Emperor of China, Shen Neng. Cannabis has appeared in all subsequent major pharmacopoeias including an Ayurvedic Medicine Materia Medica, dated from between 1100 B.C.E. and 1700 B.C.E., as well as the Ebers Papy...
More

Study: Review of CBD for treatment-resistant epilepsy

This recent clinical trial concerning cannabidiol (CBD) and seizure disorders demonstrated that “CBD might reduce seizure frequency and an adequate safety profile in children and young adults with highly treatment-resistant epilepsy.” In 2016, doctors across the United States began an open-label interventional trial focused on patients (aged 1–30 years) with severe, intractable, childhood-onset, treatment-resistant epilepsy. These patients were all receiving stable doses of anti-epileptic medications prior to study entry and were enrolled in an expanded-access program at 11 epilepsy cente...
More

Commentary: Endorsing Cannabis as an Opioid Substitute ‘Irresponsible’

This is yet another piece of propaganda in the counter-attack by Big Pharma/FDA/DEA on our progress. So sad, so stereotypical and so mistaken. I am really embarrassed by this endless repetition of falsehoods and circular reasoning. I think we have to call it for what it is, push forward the recent World Health Organization recommendations for rescheduling to lowest category possible, which would facilitate better research on safer alternatives that could end this epidemic. Anything else is what is irresponsible. -Dr. David Ostrow Endorsing Cannabis as an Opioid Substitute 'Irresponsibl...
More

Quality vs. Junk Science: Read the Study, Not Just the Headline

The United States is in an epidemic; there are too many people rejecting real science while embracing junk. This is not an isolated phenomenon, it applies to global warming, disease prevention and policy toward substance use and abuse. Just because a study has been done doesn’t mean it is a well-designed, valid study. One needs to look beyond the alleged results and look at the design. We need to look at the results with a critical eye toward such matters as study design and raw data, and how the data has been integrated. When you read a new headlines about a study ask questions. Is i...
More